The Nossob-Auob River Basin is located in the south-eastern part of Namibia across parts of the Hardap, Karas, Khomas and Omaheke Regions and is predominantly characterized by the Kalahari desert shared across the Namibian-Botswana borders.

No BMC has been established in the Nossob-Auob River basin.

Further information:

Municipal costs to provide a household with water and sanitation services include: charges for water collection from a source; water production (treatment of raw water to drinking water standards); water delivery to the consumer; and wastewater treatment and disposal. Wastewater collection and treatment contribute to hygienic environments and form part of the water chain to prevent pollution in order to ensure that good water quality and sanitation are achieved. Therefore it is essential that water consumers PAY for water services to ensure continued quality and efficient service delivery.

In rural areas, the community based water management programme under the Directorate of Water Supply and Sanitation Coordination, established mechanisms for users to pay for water services. In addition, mechanisms for transparent and targeted subsidies for those who are unable to pay for water services are being considered. Local water point committees manage local aspects of water services, preventing problems such as illegal connections and vandalism to pipelines.

Different ways to save water in urban households:

1. Schedule garden watering for early or late in the day (before 10 am and after 4 pm)

2. Avoid the use of hosepipes for cleaning floors, pavements or cars; instead use buckets

3. Make use of retrofits (replacement with equipment specifically designed to reduce water use) such as:

3.1 Low flush and dual flush cisterns that are being used more and more.
3.2 Reducing the volume of existing toilet cisterns can be achieved by:
*Placing a 1 to 2 litre plastic bottle filled with water, or a brick wrapped in plastic, inside the cistern. This will decrease the volume of water held within it.
* Bending the swimmer arm inside the cistern downwards so that the inflow valve is shut off when the water reaches a lower level than previously.

4. Fix or report to the municipality any moisture or leak problems immediately. Most water leaks occur from toilet cisterns. A single leaking toilet cistern can lose up to 7 000 litres of water per day.

5. Explore rain water harvesting (collection and storage of rain from run-off areas such as roofs) options. Remember - the first flush of new rain should be discarded, before collection starts.

6. Keep track of water usage by regularly reading the water meters.

No BMC has been established.

General